According to the AI, schematic design is "the preparation of tidies to ascertain the requirements of the project, consisting of drawings and other documents illustrating the scale and relationships of the project components for approval by the owner" (The Center for Health Design, 2010, peg. 72). It is during the schematic design phase of the project that "design strategies continue to evolve based on project requirements, additional Information, and the development of new approaches to design" (The Center for Health Design, 2010, peg. 72).

When the schematic design phase Is developed correctly early In the project, the design criteria ill Include the established evidence-based design goals determined In the pre- design phase of the project (The Center for Health Design, 2010). While in the schematic design and evaluation phases of the project, "it is important to do the following: develop and annotate diagrams, document the assumptions, select the best options, begin constructing mock-up environments, and document the selected design and related hypotheses" (The Center for Health Design, 2010, peg. 2). By developing and annotating diagrams and documenting each design strategy, "the project team can effectively communicate the intent behind pacific design details and the link to improving outcomes" (The Center for Health Design, 2010, peg. 73). The assumptions documented are "qualitative [statements] describing the Intent of the design strategy, rather than a specific quantitative statement Identifying the amount of Improvement that will be achieved" (The Center for Health Design, 2010, peg. 74).

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In the early phases of the project, "a variety of space and design concepts are developed to address the project goals, space program criteria, and BED research used to inform the project" (The Center for Health Design, 2010, peg. 4). To better communicate these design concepts, mock-up environments are constructed as many team members may find it difficult to properly understand and visualize two-dimensional floor plans (The Center for Health Design, 2010). Computer software programs provide "three-dimensional computer drafting technologies help to bridge this communication gap" (The Center for Health Design, 2010, peg. 5). These mock-ups "add significant value to the final design strategies, often reducing schedule delays and costs during the construction phase" (The Center for Health Design, 2010, peg. 5). Throughout the schematic design phase, "research hypotheses established during the earlier phases of the project should be updated with the annotated diagrams, supporting Information, and design assumptions" (The Center for Health Design, 2010, peg. 80). Documenting links "between evidence-based team creates a platform that supports future design and research efforts" (The Center for Health Design, 2010, peg. 0). After the schematic design phase of the process comes design development (The Center for Health Design, 2010). According to the American Institute of Architects, sign development is "preparation of more detailed drawings and design plans" (The Center for Health Design, 2010, peg. 80). Evolving schematic concepts into architectural designs "requires a team of professionals skilled at addressing the full range of functional and operational elements of a healthcare environment" (The Center for Health Design, 2010, peg. 80).

This time in the process is crucial to ensure that the "project team work together to integrate the evidence-based features into the design by continuing to identify and address the impact of the design on the Environment of Care components, the guiding principles, and the design guidelines" (The Center for Health Design, 2010, peg. 81). The project team also "determines who needs to be involved to effectively inform the design process on the operational and functional demands of specific design strategies" (The Center for Health Design, 2010, peg. 81).

The design development phase of the process must "include members of the interdisciplinary project team, along with other users that have specific knowledge about new technologies and operational requirements" (The Center for Health Design, 2010, peg. 81). The team should also "continue to update the research plan to identify new information, ideas, and assumptions" (The Center for Health Design, 2010, peg. 81). The project team must also consider the cost of design strategies and how they contribute to the long-term success of the project and its research efforts" (The Center for Health Design, 2010).