applet
A small application located on a server; when requested, the applet is downloaded to the client.

cascading style sheet
A list of rules that defines in one single location how to display HTML elements.

circuit switching
Where a dedicated connection is formed between two points (such as two people on telephones) and the connection remains active for the duration of the transmission.

client/server model
A model of network communications where a client device such as a computer, tablet, or smartphone uses browsers to request services from networks that make up the Internet.

client-side program
A program that runs on the client computer and that requires no interaction with a web server.

commerce server
Computers that host software that enables users to buy goods and services over the web.

Common Gateway Interface (CGI)
A method of designing programs that provides a methodology by which a browser can request a program file be executed instead of just being delivered to the browser.

computer protocol
A set of rules for exchanging electronic information.

connectionless protocol
A protocol that a host computer can use to send data over the network without establishing a direct connection with any specific recipient computer.

connection-oriented protocol
A protocol for exchanging information that requires two computers to exchange control packets, thereby setting up the parameters of the data-exchange session, before sending packets that contain data.

Document Object Model (DOM)
Used by JavaScript to organize objects and page elements.

domain name system (DNS) server
A server that maintains a database of domain names and converts domain names to Internet protocol addresses.

dotted decimal number (dotted quad)
The form of an Internet protocol address, where sets of numerals are separated by decimals, i.e., 197.169.73.63.

dynamic addressing
A way of assigning Internet protocol addresses where a computer is assigned a temporary address from an available pool of addresses.

Dynamic Host Configuration Protocol (DHCP)
A protocol for assigning dynamic internet protocol addresses.

Dynamic HTML (DHTML)
A combination of technologies—HTML, cascading style sheets, and JavaScript—used to create lively and interactive websites.

element
In HTML, a pair of tags and the text between them.

e-mail server
A server whose sole function is to process and deliver incoming and outgoing e-mail.

encryption
The process of coding e-mail so that only the person with the key to the code (the intended recipient) can decode the message.

eXtensible Markup Language (XML)
A markup language that enables designers to define their own data-based tags, making it much easier for a website to transfer the key information on its page to another site; it defines what data is being described rather than how it's to be displayed.

file server
A server that stores and manages files for network users or that acts as a storehouse for files that users can download.

handshaking
In a connection-oriented protocol, the process of exchanging control packets before exchanging data packets.

hexadecimal digit
A digit with 16 possible values: 0-9 and A-F.

HTML embedded scripting language
A programming language that tucks programming code directly within the HTML of a web page; the most popular example is JavaScript.

HTML tags
Tags that surround and define HTML content (such as and , which indicate bolding).

Hypertext Transfer Protocol(HTTP)
The protocol that allows files to be transferred from a web server so that you can see them on your computer by using a browser.

Hypertext Transfer Protocol Secure (HTTPS)
The Internet protocol that ensures data is sent securely over the web.

Internet backbone
The main pathway of high-speed communications lines over which all Internet traffic flows.

Internet cache
A section of the hard drive that stores information that may be needed again, such as Internet protocol addresses and frequently accessed web pages.

Internet Corporation for Assigned Names and Numbers (ICANN)
The organization that registers Internet protocol addresses to ensure they're unique and haven't been assigned to other users.

Internet exchange point (IXP)
A way of connecting Internet service providers (ISPs) that's made up of one or more network switches to which the ISPs connect.

Internet Protocol (IP)
One of the original two protocols developed for the Internet.

Internet Protocol version 4 (IPv4)
The original Internet protocol addressing scheme, created in 1981.

Internet Protocol version 6 (IPv6)
An Internet protocol (IP) addressing scheme that makes IP addresses longer, thereby providing more available addresses.

IP address
See Internet Protocol (IP) address.

JavaScript
A scripting language that's often used to add interactivity to web pages; often used for creating Dynamic HTML effects.

JSON
Stands for Javascript Object Notation; a syntax for exchanging information between computers.

key pair
The two keys used in public-key encryption.

Multipurpose Internet Mail Extensions (MIME)
Specification for sending files as attachments to e-mail.

negative acknowledgment (NAK)
In data exchange, the communication sent from one computer or system to another stating that it did not receive a data packet in readable form.

octet
A reference to each of the four numbers in a dotted decimal number internet protocol address, so called because each number would have eight numerals in binary form.

open system
A system having the characteristic of being public for access by any interested party; as opposed to a proprietary system.

optical carrier (OC) line
A high-speed fiber-optic line.

packet (data packet)
A small segment of data that's bundled for sending over transmission media. Each packet contains the address of the computer or peripheral device to which it's being sent.

packet switching
A communications methodology that makes computer communication efficient; in packet switching, data is broken into smaller chunks called packets.

point of presence (POP)
A bank of modems, servers, routers, and switches through which Internet users connect to an Internet service provider.

positive acknowledgement (ACK)
In data exchange, the confirmation sent from one computer or system to another saying that the computer has received a data packet that it can read.

Pretty Good Privacy (PGP)
A public-key package for encryption available for download on the Internet.

private key
The key for decoding retained as private in public-key encryption.

private-key encryption
A type of encryption where only the two parties involved in sending the message have the code.

proprietary system
A system having the characteristic of being closed to public access (private), as opposed to an open system.

public key
The key for coding distributed to the public in public-key encryption.

public-key encryption
A type of encryption where two keys, known as a key pair, are created. One key is used for coding and the other for decoding. The key for coding is distributed as a public key, while the private key is retained for decoding.

root DNS server
A domain name system (DNS) server that contains the master listings for an entire top-level domain.

second-level domain
A domain that's directly below a top-level domain.

Secure Sockets Layer (SSL)
A network security protocol that provides for the encryption of data transmitted using the Internet. The current versions of all major web browsers support SSL.

server-side program
A type of program that runs on a web server rather than on a computer.

Simple Mail Transfer Protocol (SMTP)
The protocol responsible for sending e-mail along the Internet to its destination; part of the Internet Protocol suite.

static addressing
A way of assigning internet protocol addresses where the address for a computer never changes and is most likely assigned manually by a network administrator or an Internet service provider.

T line
A communications line that carries digital data over twisted-pair wires.

TCP/IP
The main suite of protocols used for transmitting data over the Internet. Named after Transmission Control Protocol (TCP) and the Internet Protocol (IP).

Transmission Control Protocol(TCP)
One of the original two protocols developed for the Internet.

Transport Layer Security (TLS)
An updated extension of Secure Sockets Layer.

User Datagram Protocol (UDP)
An Internet Protocol that creates data packets across the Internet.

web server
A computer running a specialized operating system that enables it to host web pages (and other information) and to provide requested web pages to clients.

web server
A computer running a specialized operating system that enables it to host web pages (and other information) and to provide requested web pages to clients.

Internet Protocol (IP)
sends data between computers on the internet

Transmission Control Protocol (TCP)
prepares data for transmission and provides for error checking and re-sending of lost data

User Datagram Protocol (UDP)
prepares data for transmission; lacks resending capabilities

File Transfer Protocol (FTP)
enables files to be downloaded to a computer or uploaded to other computers

Telnet
Enables user to log in to a remote computer and work on it as if sitting front of it

Hypertext Transfer Protocol (HTTP) and HTTP secure (HTTPS)
Transfers Hypertext Markup Language (HTML) data from servers to browsers; HTTPS is an encrypted protocol for secure transmissions

Simple Mail Transfer Protocol (SMTP)
Used for transmission of e-mail messages across the internet

Dynamic Host Configuration Protocol (DHCP)
Takes a pool of IP addresses and shares them with hosts on a network on an as-needed basis

How would you reply to an email message you've received that has multiple recipients, all of whom you would like to see your reply?
Click Reply All

When you wish to send an email message to multiple parties, you enter their addresses in the To: line separated by which of the following?
Commas

Which of the following characteristics of an email message should cause suspicion?
No Subject line

Where would you enter the email address for a person whom you do not want the recipient to know you are including with the message?
Bcc: line

What is an IP address and where I can find the IP address for my computer?
An IP address is a unique number identification assigned to each computer, server, or device connected to the Internet. To find your IP address, go to Google and type "what is my IP."

An IP address
is a unique identification number assigned to each computer, server, or device connected to the Internet. A typical IP address is expressed as a series of numbers separated by decimal points, such as 197.169.73.63, and is called a dotted decimal number. Internet Corporation for Assigned Names and Numbers (ICANN) is responsible for allocating IP addresses to network administrators. To find your IP address, go Google and type "what is my IP."

2. Does the IP address remain the same or can it change automatically?
The IP address changes automatically if your computer has a dynamic IP address. A dynamic IP address is a temporary IP address and is assigned by your ISP when your computer connects to the Internet.

Dynamic addressing
is a temporary IP address assigned to you by your ISP from an available pool of IP addresses. It is assigned by the dynamic host configuration protocol (DHCP) each time you log on to the Internet. IP addresses can also be assigned statically. Static addressing means that the IP address for a computer never changes and is most likely assigned manually by a network administrator.

Is there an alternative to remembering IP addresses?
Yes, you can use a domain name. A domain name is simply a name that takes the place of an IP address, making it easier to remember.

A domain name
is simply a name that takes the place of an IP address, making it easier for people to remember it. Yahoo.com and Aol.com are domain names. Domains are organized by level. The portion of the domain name after the dot is the top-level domain (TLD), such as .com. Within the top-level domain are many second-level domains, such as Amazon.com and Microsoft.com.

But how do computers get the IP address from a domain name?
Computers consult the domain name system (DNS) server. The DNS server contains a mapping of domain names with their corresponding IP addresses.

When you enter a domain name into a web browser
your computer converts the domain name into an IP address by consulting a database maintained on a DNS server, which functions like a phone book for the Internet. Your ISP's web server has a default DNS server that it goes to when it needs to translate a domain name into an IP address. Your ISP or network administrator defines the default DNS server.

What if the ISP's web server cannot locate the IP information on the default DNS server?
The default DNS server contacts one of the DNS servers. A root DNS server knows the location of all the DNS servers that contain the master listings for an entire top-level domain.

The default DNS server
contacts one of the root DNS servers. A root DNS server knows the location of all the DNS servers that contain the master listings for an entire top-level domain. Your ISP's default DNS server receives the information from the master DNS server. It then stores that information for further reference and passes it on to the ISP web server as well as communicates the appropriate IP address to your computer.

When my friend connects to my computer, how is data transferred?
Computers communicate efficiently using the communication methodology called packet switching.

Packet switching
is the communications methodology that makes computer communication efficient. In packet switching, data is broken into smaller chunks called packets, which are sent over various routes at the same time. Packet switching doesn't require that a dedicated communications circuit be maintained.

If data is broken into chunks and sent over various routes at the same time, how do these packets reach their destination?
The packets contain destination information and are reassembled when they all reach the destination.

The packets
contain destination information and are reassembled when they reach the destination. Packet contents vary depending on the protocol being followed. At a minimum, all packets must contain an address to which the packet is being sent, the address from where the packet originates, reassembling instructions if the original data was split between packets, and the data that is being transmitted.

How do packets travel through the Internet?
Packets are routed using Transmission Control Protocol/Internet Protocol (TCP/IP). TCP/IP is a suite of protocols used to route packets over the Internet.

TCP/IP
is a suite of protocols used to route packets over the Internet, not encrypt files. The suite is named after the original two protocols, the Transmission Control Protocol (TCP) and the Internet Protocol (IP). The suite actually comprises many protocols like user datagram protocol (UDP), file transfer protocol (FTP), Telnet, hypertext transfer protocol (HTTP), secure HTTP (S-HTTP), and simple mail transfer protocol (SMTP).

circuit switching
A dedicated connection is formed between two points (such as two people on telephones), and the connection remains active for the duration of the transmission.

classless interdomain routing (CIDR)
Because the unique IP addressing system offers only a fixed number of IP addresses, a different addressing scheme known as classless interdomain routing (CIDR) allows a single IP address to represent several unique IP addresses by adding a network prefix (a slash and a number) to the end of the last octet.

computer protocol
A set of rules for exchanging electronic information.

connectionless protocol
Does not require any type of connection to be established or maintained between two computers that are exchanging information.

connection-oriented protocol
Requires two computers to exchange control packets, thereby setting up the parameters of the data exchange session, before sending packets that contain data.

domain name
Simply a name that takes the place of an IP address, making it easier for people to remember.

dotted decimal number (or dotted quad)
A typical IP address is expressed as follows: 197.169.73.63

DNS (domain name system)
When you enter the URL in your browser, your computer must convert the URL to an IP address. To do this, your computer consults a database that is maintained on a DNS (domain name system) server that functions like a phone book for the Internet.

dynamic addressing
Your computer is assigned an address from an available pool of IP addresses; more common addressing.

dynamic host configuration protocol (DHCP)
Dynamic addressing is normally handled by the dynamic host configuration protocol (DHCP), which belongs to the TCP/IP protocol suite. DHCP takes a pool of IP addresses and shares them with hosts on the network on an as-needed basis.

handshaking
A connection-oriented protocol requires two computers to exchange control packets, thereby setting up the parameters of the data exchange session, before sending packets that contain data. This process is referred to as handshaking.

hexadecimal notation
IPv6 uses 8 groups of 16-bit numbers, referred to as hexadecimal notation (hex for short).

Internet Corporation for Assigned Names and Numbers (ICANN)
IP addresses must be registered with the ICANN, which is responsible for allocating IP addresses to network administrators, just as the U.S. Postal Service is responsible for assigning zip codes to geographic areas.

Internet Protocol version 4 (IPv4)
The original IP addressing scheme created in the early 1980s.

Internet Protocol version 6 (IPv6)
An IP addressing scheme developed by the Internet Engineering Task Force (IETF) to make IP addresses longer, thereby providing more available IP addresses. IPv6 uses 8 groups of 16-bit numbers, referred to as hexadecimal notation (hex for short).

IP address
A unique identification number that defines each computer, service, or other device that connects to the Internet.

negative acknowledgment (NAK)
If the packet is unreadable (damaged in transit), then Y sends a negative acknowledgment (NAK) to X, indicating the packet was not received in understandable form. X then retransmits that packet.

network prefix
A slash and a number at the end of the last octet. The network prefix identifies how many of the possible 32 bits in a traditional IP address are to be used as the unique identifier, leaving the remaining bits to identify the specific host.

open system
In an open system, its design would be made public for access by any interested party.

packet (or data packet)
With packet switching, data is broken into smaller chunks (each one called a packet or a data packet) that are sent over various routes at the same time.

packet switching
The communications methodology that makes computer communication efficient.

positive acknowledgment (ACK)
Assume that two systems, X and Y, have established a connection. When Y receives a data packet that it can read from X, it sends back a positive acknowledgment (ACK). If X does not receive an ACK in an appropriate period of time, it resends the packet.

proprietary system
This proprietary or private system model was the norm for Internet protocol.

root DNS server
There are 13 root DNS servers maintained throughout the Internet. Each root DNS server knows the location of all the DNS servers that contain the master listings for an entire top-level domain.

second-level domain
Within each top-level domain are many second-level domains. A second-level domain needs to be unique within its own top-level domain but not necessarily unique to all top-level domains.

static addressing
Means that the IP address for a computer never changes and is most likely assigned manually by a network administrator or ISP.

TCP/IP (Transmission Control Protocol (TCP) and Internet Protocol (IP))
Main suite of protocols used is TCP/IP. The suite is named after the original two protocols that were developed for the Internet: the Transmission Control Protocol (TCP) and the Internet Protocol (IP).

three-way handshake
A connection-oriented protocol requires two computers to exchange control packets, thereby setting up the parameters of the data exchange session, before sending packets that contain data. This process is referred to as handshaking. TCP uses a process called a three-way handshake to establish a connection.

user datagram protocol (UDP)
The Internet Protocol is responsible only for sending packets on their way. The packets are created by either the TCP or the user datagram protocol (UDP).

____ addressing means that your ISP assigns your computer a temporary IP address from an available pool of IP addresses each time you log on to the internet
Dynamic

How does the computer know the IP addresses of other computers?
Your computer consults a database maintained on a domain name server to determining other IP addresses.

_____ is the main suite of protocols used on the internet
TCP/IP

The communications methodology that computers use to transfer data is called _____
packet switching

At a minimum, all data packets must contain the _____
recipient's address, sender's address, reassembling instructions, and data.

All IP addresses must be registered with the _____, which is responsible for allocating IP addresses to network adminstrators
ICANN

An IP address that does not change and is usually assigned manually by a network administrator is called a ____
static address

197.169.73.63 is an example of a(n) _____
IP address

When using ____ addressing, your computer is assigned an address from an available pool of IP addresses
Dynamic

____ addressing means that the IP address for a computer never changes and is most likely manually assigned by a network administrator
Static

TCP/IP stands for
Transmission Control Protocol/Internet Protocol

The original IP addressing scheme created in the early 1980's is called ____
IPv4

Forms a dedicated connection between two communicating parties
Circuit switching

manually assigned IP address
static IP

breaks information down into pieces that can take different paths
packet switching

changeable IP address
dynamic IP

original IP addressing scheme
IPv4

Unique identification number identifying each computer, service, or other internet connected device
IP address

used in place of an IP address
domain name

acts like an IP address phone book for computers
DNS server

IP address for a computer does not change
static addressing

IP address for a computer is assigned from a pool of available IP addressed
dynamic addressing

What is SMTP?
Simple mail transfer protocol (SMTP) is the protocol responsible for sending e-mail messages from an e-mail client to an e-mail server.

SMTP
is the protocol responsible for sending e-mail messages from an e-mail client to an e-mail server of an Internet Service Provider (ISP) or a company website. Users get their SMTP server information from their ISP when they first set up their e-mail.

What's an e-mail client and e-mail server?
An e-mail client is an e-mailing application (such as Microsoft Outlook) from which an e-mail message is sent, and an e-mail server is a specialized computer that stores, processes, and sends e-mails.

An e-mail client
is not a computer but rather the e-mailing application (such as Microsoft Outlook) from which an e-mail is sent. An e-mail server is not e-mailing software but rather a specialized computer that stores, processes, and sends e-mails. All e-mail has to pass through e-mail servers.

When I attach a file to my e-mail, will SMTP send it to the e-mail server?
The multipurpose Internet mail extensions (MIME) protocol is responsible for sending e-mail file attachments.

The multipurpose Internet mail extensions (MIME) protocol
is responsible for sending e-mail file attachments. The MIME specification was introduced in 1991 to simplify attachments to e-mail messages. All e-mail client software now uses this protocol for attaching files. E-mail is still being sent in text, but the e-mail client using the MIME protocol now handles the encoding and decoding of e-mail file attachments for users.

Will SMTP keep my e-mails safe?
No, SMTP cannot keep your e-mails safe, but there are other security measures like encryption that can keep your e-mails safe.

SMTP
cannot keep your e-mails safe. Copies of your e-mail messages may exist temporarily or permanently on numerous servers as they make their way through the Internet. However, two options exist for protecting your sensitive e-mail messages: encryption and secure data transmission software.

How do I perform encryption?
You can encrypt messages using private-key encryption. In private-key encryption, only the two parties involved in sending and receiving the message have the code.

In private-key encryption
only the two parties involved in sending the message (not the server) have the code. This can be a simple shift code where letters of the alphabet are shifted to a new position. The main problem with private-key encryption is key security. If someone steals a copy of the code, the code is broken.

Is there any other safer way to encrypt emails?
You can use public-key encryption. In public-key encryption, two keys are created, one key for encoding and the other for decoding.

In public-key encryption
two keys are created one key for coding and the other for decoding. The key for coding is generally distributed as a public key. You can place this key on your website, for instance. Anyone wishing to send you a message codes it using your public key. When you receive the message, you use your private key to decode it.

Do instant messaging (IM) services use secure data transmission software to provide security of data exchanged?
No, most instant messaging services don't use secure data transmission software. Hence it is not safe to exchange important data over IM.

Most IM services
do not use encryption for IM messages, and the secure data transmission software used on e-mail does not work with IM programs. Therefore, it is not a good idea to send sensitive information using instant messaging because it is susceptible to interception and possible misuse by hackers.

e-mail servers
Specialized computers whose sole function is to store, process, and send e-mail.

encryption
Refers to the process of coding your e-mail so that only the person with the key to the code (the intended recipient) can decode (or decipher) and read the message.

key pair
In public-key encryption, two keys, known as a key pair, are created.

multipurpose Internet mail extensions (MIME)
A specification introduced in 1991 to simplify attachments to e-mail messages. All e-mail client software now uses this protocol to attach files.

Pretty Good Privacy (PGP)
A tried-and-true public-key encryption package available for download; public-key encryption is the most commonly used encryption on the Internet.

private key
When you receive the message, you use your private key to decode it. You are the only one who ever possesses the private key, and therefore it is highly secure. The keys are generated in such a way that they can work only with each other.

private-key encryption
An encryption where only the two parties involved in sending the message have the code.

public key
In public-key encryption, the key for coding is generally distributed as a public key.

public-key encryption
In public-key encryption, two keys, known as a key pair, are created. You use one key for coding and the other for decoding. The key for coding is generally distributed as a public key.

simple mail transfer protocol (SMTP)
The protocol responsible for sending e-mail along the Internet to its destination.

Which protocol is used to transmit e-mail over the internet?
SMTP

A good way to protect your e-mails is to use _____
encryption

____ is the ability of two or more people to communicate in text over the internet in real time
Instant messaging

Which of the following specifications is used to simplify attachments to e-mail messages?
MIME

When only the two parties involved in sending a message have the code, this is called ____-key encryption
private

Which protocol uses standard internet connections to make phone calls over the internet
VoIP

Which of the following is an example of an e-mail client?
Microsoft Outlook

_____ is the process of encoding data so that only the person with the key can decode and read the message.
encryption

A(n) _____ is a specialized computer with the sole function of storing, processing, and sending email
e-mail server

The _____ protocol is used by commerce servers to protect information from being intercepted by hackers
SSL

MIME stands for
Multipurpose internet mail extensions

_____ encryption is the most commonly used encryption on the internet
public-key

____ technology is used to make free long-distance calls
VoIP

The _____ encryption, only the two parties involved in sending a message have the code to unlock the message
private-key

In ____ encryption, a key pair is created, where one key is for coding and the other is for decoding
public-key

protocol used for sending attachments with e-mail
MIME

technology used to transmit phone calls over the internet
VoIP

protocol responsible for sending e-mail along the internet to its destination
SMTP

public-key encryption package
PGP

process of encoding an e-mail so that only the recipient can read it
encryption

Which is NOT a common protocol used on the Internet?
PGP

Packet switching sends information between two points
by breaking it into small chunks and sending the chunks across different routes.

In the client-server model, clients are phones or computers and servers are
computers hosting web pages. computers that are storehouses for files. computers with software allowing you to make purchases.

The main suite of Internet protocols used to transmit data is called
TCP/IP.

A _________ takes the place of an IP address because it's easier for humans to recall than a long string of numbers.
domain name

XML and JSON
allow web services to exchange information.

The protocol used to send e-mail over the Internet is
SMTP.

Cascading style sheets allow you to quickly change
the rules for applying formatting to an HTML document.

HTML5
supports powerful multimedia effects.

MIME is a protocol that's used when you're
sending an e-mail that has a file attached.

The standards to ensure uniformity of HTML around the world are set by the__________.
World Wide Web Consortium

Which of the following statements about HTML is FALSE?
It is a programming language, like Java.

What does HTML stand for?
Hypertext Markup Language

Which of the following HTML sections contains the text and graphics that are displayed in the browser window?
BODY

So that it can be recognized as a web page, you should save your Notepad document with a(n) __________ extension.
.htm or .html

HTML tags are enclosed in __________.

Which of the following is NOT an HTML tag?

Which of the following is NOT an HTML section?
LINK

Closing tags differ from opening tags in that they include a(n) __________ at the beginning of the tag.
forward slash (/)

The easiest way to create a web page is to use __________.
Microsoft Word

Creating web pages with HTML requires _____
any text editor such as Microsoft Notepad

A good website for learning about HTML code is ____
htmlgoodies.earthweb.com

Opening HTML tags are enclosed within ____
<>

Closing HTML tags include the additional __ character
/

All of the following are sections of a web page EXCEPT ___
Foot

If you want your name to appear in the title bar of the browser window when the web page displays, you should put it in the ____ section.
HEAD

Which of the following is a header tag?

Which of the following is NOT an HTML tag?

Each element in HTML documents are marked with ____
tags

Which HTML section contains elements that are not displayed in a browser when viewing a web page?
HEAD

The text between and will be ______ when displayed on a web page
underlined

The beginning and ending of paragraphs are marked by the ___ and ____ tags

and

HTML stands for _____
Hypertext Markup Language

You can create a sophisticated online resume by using Microsoft ____
Word

HTML is a monogramming language
False

HTML tags cannot be nested within each other
False

HTML files have the .htm or .html file extension
True

HTML is controlled by the World Wide Web Consortium
True

The text between and will appear on a web page in bold
True

Element

New York

Opening tag

closing tag

section in an HTML document that displays text and graphics in a browser
Body

file extension
htm

The collection of large national and international network providers used to establish the internet is called the ____
internet backbone

The information in a data packet includes
the To address, From address, data, and reassembly instructions

IPv6 uses 32 bits to assign
an address to every device connected to the internet

A cascading style sheet is a list of rules that defines which of the following?
how to display HTML elements

HTTPS is different than HTTP because
it is a combination of HTTP and the Secure Sockets Layer (SSL)

Encryption is used to
code your e-mail so only one person can decipher it

An optical carrier (OC) line is a high-speed fiber optic line that forms the backbone of the internet
True

Your internet service provider has a default domain name server to translate a URL into an IP address
True

Instant messaging is secure because of the type of encryption used
False

MIME is the protocol that supports sending files as e-mail attachments
True

Which one of the following organizations provides direction for the maintenance and development of Internet protocols?
Internet Architecture Board

The ____________ is a collection of large national and international networks.
Internet backbone

The main paths of the Internet
are known collectively as the Internet backbone; which is a collection of large national and international networks.

When packets reach their destination:
they are reassembled by the receiving computer.

When packets reach their destination
they are reassembled by the receiving computer.

Which of the following is a typical IP address?
197.169.72.74

Which of the following is NOT a TCP/IP protocol?
ICANN

SMTP, DHCP, and FTP are TCP/IP protocols
ICANN is the Internet Corporation for Assigned Names and Numbers.

Two of the most popular methods of designing programs that execute on a server and give a web page more sophisticated capabilities are ASP.NET and ____________.
CGI

JavaScript uses the ____________ Model to organize the objects and page elements on a web page.
Document Object.

Which of the following is a common language used to create CGI scripts?
Perl

The two basic types of encryption are private- and ____________ key encryption.
public-

Private-key encryption and public-key encryption
are the two basic types of encryption.

_________ is the protocol responsible for sending e-mail through the Internet.
SMTP

SMTP is
the protocol responsible for sending e-mail through the Internet.

The W3C is a consortium of organizations that sets standards and develops protocols for the web.
True

The Internet Society pays for a large portion of the Internet's infrastructure and funds research and development for new technologies.
False

Each of the four numbers in a dotted decimal number in an IP address is referred to as a quartet.
False

Each of the four numbers in a dotted decimal number in an IP address is
referred to as an octet.

Static addressing is more common than dynamic addressing.
False

dynamic addressing
is more common than static addressing.

JavaScript is the most popular embedded scripting language.
True

JavaScript is
the most popular embedded scripting language.

Most instant messaging services use a high level of encryption.
False

Most instant messaging services
do not use a high level of encryption.

PGP is a private-key encryption package available for download.
False

In private-key encryption, two keys are created-one for coding and one for decoding.
False

In public-key encryption
two keys are created-one for coding and one for decoding.

DHTML is a combination of technologies-HTML, cascading style sheets, and JavaScript.
True

DHTML
is a combination of technologies-HTML, cascading style sheets, and JavaScript.

When packets are sent through the Internet, all data packets are sent through the same route.
False

When packets are sent through the Internet
data packets are sent through different routes to reach the destination.

IPv6 uses 128-bit addressing instead of 32-bit addressing.
True

Transmission Control Protocol
Prepares data for transmission and provides for error checking and resending of lost data.

Telnet
Enables a user to log in to a remote computer.

HyperText Transfer Protocol Secure
An encrypted protocol for secure transmissions.

File Transfer Protocol
Enables files to be downloaded to a computer or uploaded to other computers.

Static addressing
The IP address for a computer never changes.

Cascading style sheet
A list of rules that defines in one single location how to display HTML.

IPv4
Offers a fixed number of IP addresses.

Dynamic HTML
Combination of technologies used to create lively and interactive websites.

IP
Sends data between computers on the Internet.

SMTP
Responsible for sending e-mail to its destination.

IPv6
An IP addressing scheme developed by the IETF to make IP addresses longer.

Telnet
Enables users to login to a remote computer and work on it as if they were sitting in front of it.

Element
Pair of tags and text between them.

Internet Society
Professional membership group that provides leadership for the orderly growth and development of the Internet.

T line
Carries digital data over twisted-pair wires.

Point of presence
A bank of modems, servers, routers, and switches through which many users can connect to an ISP simultaneously.

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