By the time he died, the Marriott company operated 1,400 restaurants and 143 hotels and resorts worldwide, including two theme parks, earned USD $4. 5 billion in revenue annually with 154,600 employees. The company's interests even extended to a line of cruise ships and theme parks. Marriott was born at Marriott Settlement near Ogden, Utah, and was raised on his father's farm. His father gave him considerable responsibility at an early age: he was sent to San Francisco on his own with 3,000 sheep in a railcar at the age of 14.

At the age of 19 and as a devout Mormon, he undertook the traditional missionary work of the church for two years, being assigned to New England. After returning home to discover his family had gone bankrupt in the wake of an economic recession, Marriott decided to go back and finish his education. Despite never finishing high school, Marriott talked his way into a community college. He also negotiated a deal whereby he would pay for his tuition by teaching theology classes.

At the age of 19 and as a devout Mormon, he undertook the traditional missionary work of the church for two years, being assigned to New England. On his way home after completing his mission, he passed through Washington D. C. during the sweltering summer months of 1921. While there: "... He walked from Capitol Hill to the Washington Monument, toiled up the steps to the top, walked back down again, and strolled over to the Lincoln Memorial. Everywhere he went tourists and pedestrians sweltered and sweated in the sultry, humid air.

On the way back to his hotel, he just tood there in the street watching the crowds, he couldn't get over it: a push cart peddler would come along the street selling lemonade and soda pop and ice cream, and in minutes he would be cleaned out and on his way to stock up with another cartload". The scene he saw in New York was what actually made up his mind. It was during his senior year that Marriott decided to take advantage of the heat and open an A&W root beer stand in Salt Lake City. "A man should keep on being constructive, and do constructive things,” J. Willard Marriott once said. “He should take part in the things that go on in this wonderful world.

He should be someone to be reckoned with. He should live life and make every day count, to the very end. Sometimes it's tough. But that's what I'm going to do. ” Marriott was a brother of the Phi Delta Theta Fraternity at the University of Utah and of Alpha Kappa Psi, his son J. W. "Bill" Marriott, Jr. was a member of Sigma Chi. After graduating from Weber College in June 1923 and later, the University of Utah in June 1926, Marriott remembered his experience in Washington, D. C. and decided to look into a venture there. INITIAL RUN… In 1927, he secured from A&W Root Beer the franchise rights for Washington, D.

C. ; Baltimore, Maryland; and Richmond, Virginia; he then moved to Washington to open a nine-stool root beer stand there with his business partner, Hugh Colton. They opened on May 20, 1927 at 3128 14th Street, NW. He returned to Utah two weeks later, and married Alice Sheets on 9 June 1927. With the approach of cooler Autumn months, and with the addition of Mexican food items to the menu, the stand became The Hot Shoppe, a popular family restaurant. In 1928, he opened the first drive-in east of the Mississippi, and the business was incorporated as Hot Shoppes, Inc. n Delaware in 1929. During the Second World War, the business expanded to include the management of food services in defense plants and government buildings, such as the U. S. Treasury. By 1932, Marriott had seven Hot Shoppes and was almost a millionaire. But it was not enough for the ever aspiring entrepreneur. In 1935 he was diagnosed as having malignant cancer of the lymph nodes, and given between six months and a year to live. However, he survived and lived another half century. Marriott's restaurant chain grew, and the company went public in 1953.

In 1957, he expanded his business to hotels, opening the first Marriott hotel—actually a motel, the Twin Bridges Motor Hotel in Arlington, Virginia. The company became Marriott, Inc. , in 1967. Two large chains were added to the group, the Big Boy family restaurants in 1967 and Roy Rogers Family Restaurants in 1968. SUCCESS AND FAILURES Marriott, with $1,500 of his own saved money, along with a $1,500 loan, opened a small root beer stand in Washington, D. C. All summer long, Marriott hit the streets and experienced booming success. But as winter came, Marriott’s sales crashed.

PLAN TO COVER UP… Instead of giving up, Marriott decided to cover up the old A;W root beer sign and throw up a sign that read “Hot Shoppe”. It was his first indoor venture, and he began by doling out large quantities of Mexican food. By handing out free coupons on street corners and focusing on quality, Marriott was soon able to open up two more locations. RESOURCES: FUNDING AND INFRASTRUCTURE It was during his senior year that Marriott decided to take advantage of the heat and open an A;W root beer stand in Salt Lake City. With modest success, Marriott decided it was time for his next move.

Marriott, with $1,500 of his own saved money, along with a $1,500 loan, opened a small root beer stand in Washington, D. C. He started up with almost no infrastructure. Funding was his own savings and a loan taken up. UNIQUENESS IN MARRIOTT’S IDEA…. According to marriott himself: “you’ve got to make your employees happy. If the employees are happy, they are going to make the customers happy. " Marriott was an energetic worker and rarely rested, preferring to run his company. Many attested to the fact that he ate, lived, breathed and dreamed about how to run and improve his company.

He also bought the empty lot next to one of his hot shoppes, removed the curb, and began offering what was one of the first drive-in services in America. With waiters, called “curbers,” serving food to cars at their windows, customers could not get enough. And, neither could Marriott, who immediately began thinking of his next big move. In 1937, Marriott’s Hot Shoppe No. 8 became the home of his next innovation. Since it was located near an airport, Marriott noticed that airline passengers would often stop off to his store and buy lunch to eat on board.

With that came Marriott’s idea to sell pre-boxed meals directly to airlines. It was the launch of an entire new industry, and Marriott was soon selling lunches to more than 20 flights a day from that one airport. Continuing with food services, Marriott eventually invented airline in-flight food service. This segment of their enterprise continues to be a large part of their business, providing food services to many major airlines. "His managers never knew what time of day or night he’d show up at the kitchen door and go bird-dogging almost at a half-run through the itchen, the pantries, the storage rooms, the refrigerators, the restaurant itself, running a finger over the shelves to check for dust, checking under tables and in cutlery drawers, checking the ranges, the storage rooms, the trays about to be served, sampling the root beer, and raising hell if everything wasn’t spotless, neat, clean, bright, polished, done efficiently, done well. " Even after the company grew to include hundreds of restaurants and hotels, Marriott vowed to personally inspect every establishment at least four times a year. In establishing the culture of the company, there was a lot of attention and tender loving care paid to the hourly workers. When they were sick, he went to see them. When they were in trouble, he got them out of trouble. He created a family loyalty. " BUSINESS TODAY… In 1968, Marriott Corp. was listed on the New York Stock Exchange. In the same year, the company, under his son’s leadership, purchased the Big Boy chain of restaurants. It kept on expanding from there, launching Sun Line Cruise Ships and Marriott World Travel. With a price tag of $250 million, Marriott Corp. also opened three Great America theme parks.

In 1972, Marriott stepped down as CEO of the company he had founded decades ago. The company, however, continued to flourish, especially expanding its hotel business. Unable to fully divest himself of the business, Marriott remained chairman of the board. On August 13, 1985, Marriott died of heart failure. It was a heart that was put to good use over the years, as Marriott worked hard to build a company he could be proud of. By the time he passed away, his company was serving food to over 150 airlines, and his entire revenues exceeded $4. 5 billion. By 1999, Marriott International had become the 13th largest employer in the U.

S, as well as the second-largest lodging company in the world. The Marriott name continues to reign as a leader in the world of business. In 1968, Marriott Corp. was listed on the New York Stock Exchange. In the same year, the company, under his son’s leadership, purchased the Big Boy chain of restaurants. It kept on expanding from there, launching Sun Line Cruise Ships and Marriott World Travel. With a price tag of $250 million, Marriott Corp. also opened three Great America theme parks. In 1972, Marriott stepped down as CEO of the company he had founded decades ago.

The company, however, continued to flourish, especially expanding its hotel business. Unable to fully divest himself of the business, Marriott remained chairman of the board. On August 13, 1985, Marriott died of heart failure. It was a heart that was put to good use over the years, as Marriott worked hard to build a company he could be proud of. By the time he passed away, his company was serving food to over 150 airlines, and his entire revenues exceeded $4. 5 billion. By 1999, Marriott International had become the 13th largest employer in the U. S, as well as the second-largest lodging company in the world.