Question How Does Increasing the Intensity of Exercise Affect Respiratory Rate? Hypothesis My experiment will involve sprinting which is a very demanding and fatiguing sport. In order to increase the intensity of it, I will be increasing the weight the subject has to carry as he sprints. My hypothesis is that as you increase the weight, the respiratory rate will also increase. At rest, the average breathing rate for adults is 12-24 breaths per minute and for new born babies it is 30-60 breaths per minute. Younger people breathe more because they require more oxygen to accommodate for their rapid growth.

Similarly, when we exercise we continually form TAP, which is generated by the oxidation of glucose. The oxidation of glucose requires oxygen. If we increase the intensity of exercise, we would need a lot more TAP and therefore we would need to oxidize glucose at a faster rate and hence our breathing rate would increase so that we can increase intake of oxygen. Variables Independent Variable Weight: measured in kilograms using a weight scale and will start from OK and be increased by egg for each trial up until keg. Books will be used as weights in this experiment.

Dependent Variable * Respiratory rate: measured by counting the number of breaths for 30 seconds then doubling the number of breaths to calculate breathing rate Control Variable * Distance (mm) will be measured in meters using a tape measure and will be kept the same throughout the experiment because the same mm stretch will be seed throughout the whole experiment * Timing period (ass) while counting number of breathes will be controlled by having the same person manning the stopwatch for each trial to reduce the impact of random errors and variation.

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The number of breathes will then be multiplied by 2 each time to get breathes per minute * There will only be one person participating in the experiment and that one person will remain the same person for the whole experiment * Humidity of the environment will be kept the same by carrying out the experiment in one place.

Humidity is controlled because the level of humidity can affect the density of air and hence may cause variation if not controlled * Temperature will be kept the same by carrying out the experiment in the same outdoor location each time Equipment * A Bag * A stopwatch A tape measure Chalk A weight scale Running equipment Diagram Method Find a person to participate in the experiment 2. Find a suitable place outdoors for the experiment 3. Mark a position on the ground with a chalk to indicate the start line, which can be anywhere as long as there is sufficient space 4.

From the start line measure out mm 5. And then mark the finish line at the end of the mm stretch with the chalk again 6. For the first trial sprint the mm with an empty bag and then record the number of breaths the subject takes for 30 seconds afterward 7. To count the number of breaths, look at the subjects abdomen rise and fall. Each rise and fall equates to 1 breath taken 8. Repeat the trial 3 times so that an average can be calculated 9. Repeat steps 5-8 for the successive trials until the 5th trial.