Gir Forest National Park and Wildlife Sanctuary (also known as Sasan Gir) is a forest and Wildlife Sanctuary in Gujarat, India. Founded in 1965, whose total area is 1,412 km (about 258 km fully protected area (National Park) and 1153 km Sanctuary, the park is located 65 km south east of Junagadh. Home is the only pure Asiatic Lions (Panthera leo persica), and is considered one of the most important protected areas in Asia, as maintained by a species. Gir ecosystem, its diverse flora and fauna have been protected by the efforts of the forestry department of government, environmental activists and NGOs.

Gir Forest area and the lions had been informed of the “protected” in early 1900, the then Nawab of the princely state and Junagadh. This initiative will contribute to the conservation of the lions whose population had fallen to only 15 through slaughter for trophy hunting. April 2010 and the census recorded the lion, Gir is the number 411, an increase of 1952 compared to 2005. Leo farmed, which covers the park and its surroundings grew by about 180 lions in captivity from the beginning.

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Climatic conditions Besides the two seasons of summer and winter, Gir has tropical monsoon one. It can get very hot in summer, with temperatures reaching 43 ° C twelve o’clock or 109 ° F and humid during the monsoon in June In winter the temperature drops to about 10 ° C or 50 ° F. The monsoon normally starts from mid-June and lasts until September, with annual rainfall between 600 mm and 1000 mm. But due to irregular monsoon and uneven distribution of precipitation on the peninsula, is from years of widespread drought.

Gir Forest National Park Posted on March 5, 2011 by Admin Gir Forest National Park and Wildlife Sanctuary (also known as Sasan Gir) is a forest and Wildlife Sanctuary in Gujarat, India. Founded in 1965, whose total area is 1,412 km (about 258 km fully protected area (National Park) and 1153 km Sanctuary, the park is located 65 km south east of Junagadh. Home is the only pure Asiatic Lions (Panthera leo persica), and is considered one of the most important protected areas in Asia, as maintained by a species. Gir ecosystem, its diverse flora and fauna have been protected by the efforts of the forestry department of government, environmental activists and NGOs.

Gir Forest area and the lions had been informed of the “protected” in early 1900, the then Nawab of the princely state and Junagadh. This initiative will contribute to the conservation of the lions whose population had fallen to only 15 through slaughter for trophy hunting. April 2010 and the census recorded the lion, Gir is the number 411, an increase of 1952 compared to 2005. Leo farmed, which covers the park and its surroundings grew by about 180 lions in captivity from the beginning. Climatic conditions Besides the two seasons of summer and winter, Gir has tropical monsoon one.

It can get very hot in summer, with temperatures reaching 43 ° C twelve o’clock or 109 ° F and humid during the monsoon in June In winter the temperature drops to about 10 ° C or 50 ° F. The monsoon normally starts from mid-June and lasts until September, with annual rainfall between 600 mm and 1000 mm. But due to irregular monsoon and uneven distribution of precipitation on the peninsula, is from years of widespread drought. The Gir Forest National Park and Wildlife Sanctuary (also known as Sasan-Gir) is a forest and wildlife sanctuary in Gujarat, India.

Established in 1965, with a total area of 1412 km? (about 258 km? for the fully protected area (the national park) and 1153 km? for the Sanctuary), the park is located 65 km to the south-east of Junagadh and 60 km to south west of Amreli. It is the sole home of the pure Asiatic Lions (Panthera leo persica) and is considered to be one of the most important protected areas in Asia due to its supported species. The ecosystem of Gir, with its diverse flora and fauna, is protected as a result of the efforts of the government forest department, wildlife activists and NGOs.

The forest area of Gir and its lions were declared as "protected" in the early 1900s by the then Nawab of the princely state of Junagadh. This initiative assisted in the conservation of the lions whose population had plummeted to only 15 through slaughter for trophy hunting. The April 2010 census recorded the lion-count in Gir at 411, an increase of 52 compared to 2005. The lion breeding programme covering the park and surrounding area has bred about 180 lions in captivity since its inception. Flora More than 400 plant species were recorded in the survey of Gir forest by Samtapau & Raizada in 1955.

The Botany department of M. S. University of Baroda has revised the count to 507 during their survey. According to the 1964 forest type classification by Champion & Sheth, the Gir forest falls under "5A/C-1a—very dry teak forest" classification. Teak occurs mixed with dry deciduous species. The degradation stages (DS) sub-types are thus derived as: 1) 5/DS1-Dry deciduous scrub forest and 2) 5/DS1-Dry savannah forests (Locally known as "vidis"). It is the largest dry deciduous forest in western India. Teak bearing areas are mainly in the eastern portion of the forest, which constitutes nearly half of the total area.

The forest is an important biological research area with considerable scientific, educational, aesthetic and recreational values. It provides nearly 5 million kilograms of green grass by annual harvesting, which is valued approximately at Rs. 50 crores (Rs. 500,000,000) (US$ 10 million). The forest provides nearly 15,000 metric tons worth of fuel wood annually. Among the smaller mammals, Porcupine and Hare are common but the Pangolin is rare. The reptiles are represented by the mugger Marsh crocodile (highest population among all protected areas in India), the Indian Star Tortoise and the Monitor Lizard in the water areas of the sanctuary.

Snakes are found in the bushes and forest. Pythons are sighted at times along the stream banks. Gir has been used by the Gujarat State Forest Department which adopted the Indian Crocodile Conservation Project in 1977 and released close to 1000 Marsh crocodile reared in Gir rearing centre into the Kamaleshwar lake and other reservoirs and small water bodies in and around Gir. The plentiful avifauna population has more than 300 species of birds, most of which are resident. The scavenger group of birds has 6 recorded species of Vultures.

Some of the typical species of Gir include Crested Serpent Eagle, endangered Bonelli's Eagle, Crested Hawk-eagle, Brown Fish Owl, Great Horned Owl, Bush Quail (or Quailbush), Pygmy Woodpecker, Black-headed Oriole, Crested Treeswift and Indian Pitta. The Indian Grey Hornbill was not found in the last census of 2001. The Gir forest can be classified as a mix of dry deciduous and very dry teak forests. The forest is an important biological research area with considerable scientific, educational, aesthetic, recreational and most of all economic values.

It provides nearly 5 million kgs. f green grass by annual harvesting, which is valued approximately at Rs. 50 crores (Rs. 500,000,000) (US$ 10 million). The forest provides nearly 15,000 metric tons worth of fuel wood annually. Hopefully that is reason enough, along with the various environmental services the forests provides us with, to protect them. The tag of a dry land doesn't deprive Gir of life, it is full of survivors. The star is definitely the male Lion - best bet is to step out early morning when the loners, pairs or the pride are on patrol, they do not perceive humans as a threat, so its quite possible to sight them at close quarters.

The 38 species of mammals' list also includes mongoose, chowsingha and nilgai, which are commonly seen. Its more elusive inhabitants include the leopard (more than 200), spotted hyena and the jungle cat. Also found here are the star tortoise and monitor lizard. Gir is also a place to view the marsh crocodile, their numbers are close to a thousand. More than 300 species of birds have been listed from Gir, including raptors such as ospreys, perigrine falcons, fish owls, crested serpent eagles, bonelli's eagles, goshawks and Montagu's Harriers.

Water birds include redshanks, jacanas, plovers, marsh sandpipers, ruddy shelduck, spotbills, shovellers, nakta, little grebes, lesser whistling teal, ibis and painted storks. Other avians that might keep birdwatchers busy are wrynecks, nightjars, pygmy woodpeckers, Indian pittas, shrikes, drongos, barbets, Indian rollers, grey partridge, jungle bush quail, painted sandgrouse, Ggeen pigeons, paradise flycatchers, bush larks, bee eaters, minivets and warblers. Gir National Park also known as Gir Wildlife Sanctuary Gujarat.

Gir National Park is located in Gujarat. The Gir National Park was recognized as a Forest Reserve on 18th of September, 1965 in-order to conserve the highly endangered Asiatic lion. In 1975, some part of Gir Wildlife Sanctuary was declared as national park. Due to the conservation efforts, the lion population has increased from 177 in 1974 to 411 in 2010. Gir Wildlife Sanctuary is situated in Junagadh which is a District of Gujarat state. Gir National Park is the last home of Asiatic lion which has been restricted to this jungle, since 1884.

In 1985, approximately 239 lions were available in Gir Sanctuary. The Asiatic lion is a little smaller in-comparison to the African lion. The finest method to watch the big cats is into their usual environment at dusk and dawn when these lions are on the stalk. Formerly Gir was protected by the royal family also known as Nawab of princely state of Junagadh. Later British viceroys took to their notice the dilemma of the Asiatic lion. Gir Wildlife sanctuary is a gem of ecological sources of Gujarat.