Ang Paboritong Libro ni Hudas (The Favorite Book of Judas) or The Black Book is a 2003 semi-biography book by Filipino author Bob Ong. It was his third published work and the first book where he first introduces fiction to his readers. The book is divided into seven chapters--each chapter titles is an anagram of the 7 deadly/capital sins: Chapter 1: Veny - Enwmay be characterized by an insatiable desire; they differ, however, for two main reasons. First, greed is largely associated with material goods, where as enw may apply more generally.

Second, those who commit the sin of enw esent that another person has something they perceive themselves as lacking, and wish the other person to be deprived of it. Dante defined this as "a desire to deprive other men of theirs. " Enw can be directly related to the Ten Commandments, specifically "Neither shall you desire... anything that belongs to your neighbour". In Dante's Purgatory, the punishment for the envious is to have their eyes sewn shut with wire because they have gained sinful pleasure from seeing others brought low.

Aquinas described enw as "sorrow for another's good". [11] Chapter 2: Geran - Anger(Latin, ira), also known as anger or "rage", may be described as inordinate and uncontrolled feelings of hatred and anger. Anger, in its purest form, presents with self-destructiveness, violence, and hate that may provoke feuds that can go on for centuries. Anger may persist long after the person who did another a grievous wrong is dead. Feelings of anger can manifest in different ways, including impatience, revenge, and vigilantism.

Wrath is the only sin not necessarily associated with selfishness or self-interest (although one can of course be wrathful for selfish reasons, such as Jealousy, closely related to the sin of enw). Dante described vengeance as "love of Justice perverted to revenge and spite". In its original form, the sin of wrath also encompassed anger pointed internally rather than externally. Thus suicide was deemed as the ultimate, albeit tragic, expression of wrath directed inwardly, a final rejection of God's gifts.

Chapter 3: Depir - Prideln almost every list Pride (Latin, superbia), or hubris, is considered the original and most serious of the seven deadly sins, and indeed the ultimate source from which the others arise. It is identified as a desire to be more important or attractive than others, failing to cknowledge the good work of others, and excessive love of self (especially holding self out of proper position toward God). Dante's definition was "love of self perverted to hatred and contempt for one's neighbour. In Jacob Bidermann's medieval miracle play, Cenodoxus, pride is the deadliest of all the sins and leads directly to the damnation of the titulary famed Parisian doctor. In perhaps the best-known example, the story of Lucifer